Conquering Writer’s Block

 

You know you’re a writer when staring into space or at the screen is a crucial part of your creative process. However, this creativity gets restricted sometimes, and you find yourself frozen, with no ideas or too many ideas, and you’re unsure where you want your writing to go. This condition is called “writer’s block”.

The term was created in the 1940s by an American psychoanalyst named Edmund Bergler. The block is a temporary or lasting failure to put words on paper, and it affects everyone from first-time writers to publishing industry veterans.
Fortunately, some methods can make it a little easier on you to think your way out of this writing block.

1- Determine the root cause of the problem:
Know what has caused this issue and try to overcome it by solving the problem first. Are you anxious? stressed out? Having issues with others? Find out what’s blocking your creative spark and work toward finding the right solution.

2- Take a break:
Clear your mind and do something different for a while, then return to viewing your work with a fresh brain. And bear in mind that taking a break isn’t about procrastination. Instead, going for a walk, meditating, preparing meals, or spending time with your peers actually helps you center your creative mind.


3- Read
Read everything you can get your hands on, from the news to magazines, blogs, and advertisements. Read for inspiration. Read for fun. Read for growth.

4- Remove distractions:
Distractions are everywhere, but they can still be avoided. So, if you prefer working at libraries or coffee shops, try switching to a completely different environment, and you’ll be surprised at how fast things will turn around.

5- Free write:
Write away your writer’s block. Write freely. Let go of grammar, spelling, and complete sentences. Just write without second-guessing, and feel free to copy words from another source to get the creative juices flowing.

When trying to overcome writer’s block, keep in mind that your goal isn’t to write the perfect blog or report. Your goal is to finish the first draft. These creative blocks have a trigger, no matter how big or small. So, recognize why they’re happening, take actionable steps, and the words will come to you 🙂

by Mya Maroun

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